There are questions, concerns, and misinformation floating around the internet about the coronavirus. To help you understand how this pandemic affects you, as a pet owner, we bring you excerpts from an article posted today, March 12, 2020, from the University of Illinois, College of Veterinary Medicine. 

 

NO EVIDENCE DOGS GET COVID-19

 
Can dogs get the new coronavirus (COVID-19)?

At this time, experts believe it is very unlikely. The World Health Organization currently advises that there is no evidence to suggest that dogs or cats can be infected with the new coronavirus. The CDC also seconds that opinion, stating that, “At this time, there is no evidence that companion animals including pets can spread COVID-19.”

If experts believe it is unlikely for a dog to get COVID-19, how did a dog test “positive” in Hong Kong?
This canine patient was in close contact with an infected human, who was likely shedding large quantities of the virus. This led to the virus being in the dog’s nose. There is no indication that the dog is sick or showing any symptoms. Authorities say they will continue to quarantine and test the dog to evaluate if the canine patient becomes ill. In short, there was coronavirus on the dog just like there was coronavirus on the floor in the room but the dog was not infected or diseased.

March 12, 2020 update: The dog was placed under quarantine after its owner was hospitalized with COVID-19 infection on February 26. Subsequent tests revealed weak positive results for the nasal and oral samples taken on February 28 and for the nasal samples on March 2 and March 5. The weak positive result 5 and 8 days after the dog was removed from the home where the person was sick suggests the dog has a low-level infection, which was likely caused by a case of human-to-animal transmission.
The Hong Kong Health Authorities and the World Organization for Animal Health continue to investigate. All pet mammals from households with confirmed human cases of COVID-19 will be placed under quarantine and veterinary surveillance for 14 days in Hong Kong. There is still no indication that pets can shed the virus or get sick from the virus at this time.

Is there a COVID-19 vaccine for dogs and cats?

There is no vaccine for COVID-19 for people or animals at this time.
Veterinarians are familiar with other coronaviruses. Similar but different coronavirus species cause several common diseases in domestic animals. Many dogs, for example, are vaccinated for another species of coronavirus (Canine Coronavirus) as puppies. However, this vaccine does not cross protect for COVID-19.

What animal did COVID-19 originate from?

Current research suggests that horseshoe bats are the reservoir species and the virus originated from that species as well. Previous human coronavirus outbreaks, SARS and MERS, originated in bats but passed through other species, such as the palm civet and camels.

If I am diagnosed with COVID 19 how do I protect my pet?

Since your pet is at minimal risk of COVID-19 infection there are no specific steps needed to protect them from infection. However, pets can have the virus ON THEM if they are in an environment with a large quantity of the virus and could serve to be a source of the virus for other people, including family members.  Therefore, to protect other people and yourself, the CDC recommends that you restrict contact with pets if you are sick with COVID-19, just as you would restrict your contact with other people. Avoid snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must interact with your pet, wash your hands before and after, and wear a face mask.

Should my pet wear a face mask in public?

No. Face masks may not protect your pet from disease transmission and may cause other breathing difficulties.

Should I wear a face mask?

Wearing a surgical mask will not prevent anyone (human or animal) from being exposed to the virus. A mask should be used to prevent someone that is potentially infectious from spreading the virus to others via droplets through coughing, sneezing, or talking.

How do I protect my pet and myself from COVID-19?

Since your pet is not at risk of COVID-19 infection there are no specific steps needed to protect them from infection.
To protect yourself the CDC recommends the following steps:
To protect yourself the CDC recommends the following steps:

  1. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds!
  2. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  3. Avoid close contact with sick people.
  4. Stay home when you are sick.
  5. Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, and then throw it away.
  6. Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  7. Voluntary home isolation: If you are ill with symptoms of respiratory disease such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills or fatigue, stay home. The CDC recommends that you remain at home until at least 24 hours after you are free of fever (100 degrees F) or signs of fever without the use of fever-reducing medications.
What other precautions do you recommend?

Visitation to nursing homes and long-term care facilities by service animals and their handlers should be discouraged at this time.

Sources:

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/myth-busters
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html
https://www.avma.org/blog/what-do-you-need-know-about-coronavirus